Tag Archives: Physical exercise

Physical activity: a healthy habit (among five)

11 Mar

Aerobic exercise reduces low back pain perception.

Exercising

Exercising (Photo credit: NOAA's National Ocean Service)

English: Whether you are at the beach, in a pa...

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English: Exercise work zones (Fox and Haskell ...

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From a medical point of view there are only four healthy habits: first eating 5 or more fruits and vegetables daily, second exercising regularly, third consuming alcohol in moderation, and fourth not smoking. From my point of view we could eventually add: fifth capacity for happiness and sixth meditation but both of them have not been yet scientifically evaluated as far as I know.

Exercising physically once a day takes daily a part from your precious time but could appear to be a profitable asset.

Not only for hearth’s but also for articulation’s, including the spine, health.

Provided that the exercise do not provoke any pain it brings oxygen to your muscles, articulations and their ligaments and hamstrings and thus alleviates or at least reduces chronic pain stemming from articulation disease. More than that, aerobic exercise could even reduce the perception of pain in low back pain suffering patients.

With regard to the heart which is also a muscle the AHA advises to exercise 150 minutes a week with a moderate activity like brisk walking.

But the main barrier to healthy habit implementation seems to be the lack of time according to a study here below cited. If you say often to yourself I have not enough time to do all that stuff that eventually could make me healthier, you ought to know that approximately 80 percent of people is confronted with the same issue of lack of time.

And as stated in the first study referenced below, the more the individuals are obese, the more they would benefit from acquiring healthy habits.

Works consulted:

1) Healthy Lifestyle Habits and Mortality in Overweight and Obese Individuals

http://jabfm.org/content/25/1/9.short

Matheson EM, KingDE, Everett CJ. Healthy Lifestyle Habits and Mortality in Overweight and Obese Individuals. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2012 Jan;25(1):9-15. Available from:http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2012.01.110164.

2) Pain Relief and Aerobic Benefits of an Exercise Bike

By: J. Talbot Sellers, DO

http://www.spine-health.com/wellness/exercise/pain-relief-and-aerobic-benefits-exercise-bike

3) Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

Martin D. Hoffman, MD; Melissa A. Shepanski, MS; Sean P. MacKenzie, MD; Philip S. Clifford, PhD

J o u r n a l   o f   R e  h a b i l i t a t i o  n   R e s e a r c h   &   D  e v e l o p m e n t

Volume 42, Number 2, Pages 183–190 March/April 2005

http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jour/05/42/2/pdf/Hoffman.pdf

4) Survey shows people have little time for healthy habits

March 9,2012 inHealth

Heart association finds Americans struggle to eat right, exercise and brush their teeth regularly.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-survey-people-healthy-habits.html

Does Backward Walking Help Low Back Pain?

8 Feb

Between forward and backward running, what is the best for lumbar spine?

English: Drawing of a disc herniation in the h...

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If you experimented an acute low back pain like I did (see my post entitled Christmas sciatica), when pain is lowering it would be profitable for your rehab if you could practise backward walking in your apartment. Caveat, this exercise must absolutely not increase or provoke any pain! Backward walking or backward running is a traditional remedy practiced by Japanese people. It’s simple, without risk if done in your own apartment (not outside, not to mention backward running on the road!). For the moment I practices two sort of exercise: back ward walking around my dinner room table and stretching my back with palms and toes on the carpet facing the soil, my trunk being the most horizontal as possible (no flexion nor extension, particularly of the lumbar segment). Rather astonishingly, I noticed that back pain rapidly reappear each time I walk for a while in the normal way (front ward), and does not at all manifest when I walk backward during the same amount of time. So intending not to lose my muscular mass in my lower legs I decided to walk back-ward from now on in my apartment. I only hope that my neighbours would not call the psychiatric emergencies if they could see me turning around my table back-ward 😉 And remember, walking backward avoid the shock of your heel directly on the ground by, instead, putting your toes first which act far more as shock absorbers. So if you really suffer of back pain, never mind what your neighbours would think provided that your pain be relieved and as long you can say farewell to those damned addictive painkillers!

As JANET DUFEK, ANTHONY HOUSE, BRENT MANGUS, GEOFFREY MELCHER and JOHN MERCER of the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences, University of Nevada,  Las Vegas, NV,USA, the University of Pittsburg, Human Performance Research Center, Fort Campbell, KY, USA and the Texas A&M, Commerce, TX, USA wrote:

“During backward walking, hip extension and knee flexion are greater than in forward walking(22). Greater hip extension and a concomitant extension of the lumbar spine increasingly load the facet joints opening up the disc space, causing a reduction in compressive loads to the intervertebral discs (9)….unloading of the discs via increased hip-joint extension” [1].

Caution: the text here above can not stand for a medical advice, consult first your practitioner to obtain an accurate diagnose first. The rehab is not the same if  you suffer from facet joins arthritis instead of inter vertebral disk hernia.

Works consulted:

  1. Dufek JS, House AJ, Mangus BC, Melcher GG, Mercer JA. Backward Walking: A Possible Active Exercise for Low Back Pain Reduction and Enhanced Function in Athletes. JEPonline 2011;14(1):17-26. http://faculty.css.edu/tboone2/asep/JEPonlineApril2011JanetDufek.pdf
  1. Masumoto K, Takasugi S, Hotta N, Fugishima K, Iwamoto Y. A comparison of muscle activity and heart rate response during backward and forward walking on an underwater treadmill. Gait Posture 2007;25:222-228
  1. Scannell JP, McGill SM. Disc prolapse: Evidence of reversal with repeated extension. Spine 2009;34:344-350.
  1. Bates BT, Morrison E, Hamill J. A comparison between forward and backward running. In: M. Adrian (ed.),1984 Olympic Scientific Congress Proceedings: Biomechanics (pp. 127-135),Eugene:  Mircroform Publications, 1986.
  1. Gordon SJ, Yang KH, Mayer PJ, Mace AH, Kish VL, Radin EL. Mechanism of disc rupture: A preliminary report. Spine 1991;16:450-456.
  1. http://www.nageavecpalmes-ffessm.com/fr/info/form/Docs_Techniques/Musculation%20et%20nage%20avec%20palmes.pdf
  1. http://physicaltherapy.about.com/b/2011/09/14/does-backward-treadmill-walking-help-low-back-pain.htm

Heartbreaker

30 Jan

Too much sitting may be bad for your health.

Map of Heart Disease Death Rates in US White M...

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Those who sit more often are found to have a greater risk of premature death, particularly from heart disease.
Said otherwise, prolonged sitting is a health-destroyer.
They are numerous sorts of risk/preventive factors of chronic disease or premature death: dietary, calorie’s intake, physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, sedentary behaviour. For the latter, prevention searchers have defined a surrogate or a proxy or a correlate which is the prolonged sitting time whose they are trying to asses the consequence on health. Determinants of behaviours such as healthy eating, moving, being sedentary represent a huge field of research aiming to invent the prevention slogans for the future.
More and more studies tend to prove that prolonged sitting is a heartbreaker
Now it’s time, already, to ask your boss to buy height-adjustable desks for his staff or to introduce nonseated working options in the offices.

Read more:

Neville Owen, Takemi Sugiyama, Elizabeth E. Eakin, Paul A. Gardiner, Mark S. Tremblay, James F. Sallis, Adults' Sedentary Behavior: Determinants and Interventions, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 41, Issue 2, August 2011, Pages 189-196, ISSN 0749-3797, 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.05.013.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379711003229

Too Much Sitting May Be Bad for Your Health, 11 July 2011 Elsevier
http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=108119&CultureCode=en

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