Archive | authors guidelines RSS feed for this section

Routinely reported data

5 Mar

Routinely reported data are typically the sort of data we use when we work on health care insurance data bases. So the article referenced below is very useful and accurate when working on health care insurance data bases.
Thanks to Hervé Maisonneuve Blog for having referenced this article.
https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.record-statement.org/Files/pubs/2015%20-%20PLOS%20Medicine%20-%20RECORD.pdf

http://www.h2mw.eu/redactionmedicale/2016/01/record-une-ligne-directrice-dérivée-de-strobe-pour-les-études-sur-des-données-de-vie-réelle.html

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2016

20 Jan

Scholarly Open Access

2015 2016

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2016

by Jeffrey Beall, January 5, 2016. Each year at this time I formally release my updated list of predatory publishers. Because the list is now very large, and because I now publish four, continuously-updated lists, this year’s release does not include the actual lists but instead includes statistical and explanatory data about the lists and links to them.

View original post 278 more words

Are We at a Tipping Point for Open Data?

18 Mar

Data sharing is on the rise, the French public health insurance shares openly its data as you can see in the link below:
https://www.etalab.gouv.fr/ouverture-du-fichier-damir-par-lassurance-maladie

The Scholarly Kitchen

Street sign, park nearby Image via RP Norris https://www.flickr.com/photos/rptnorris/3453936781/

Last month, President Obama showed off his dad-joke skills while announcing the appointment of the first US Chief Data Scientist. The focus of much of the White House’s messaging around this appointment has been on making the government’s own data publicly available. In his ‘memo to the American people’, however, Dr. D.J. Patil talked about acting as a conduit between government, academia and industry. In some ways, this latest move can be seen as a continuation of a US government push toward open data that mirrors efforts in Europe and elsewhere.

For a long time, there has been an expectation that researchers share data upon request with other academics but more recently, the trend has been towards making data widely and publicly available. In February 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released a memorandum on Expanding Public Access…

View original post 1,240 more words

What a good introduction paragraph looks like?

8 Feb

Putting their research in context is of a major concern for all the health services researchers. This comes from the fact that health services research is not per se a hard science. Its research object is transversal over a large range of domains extending from occupational medicine to surgery passing by pharmacology and social sciences. Thus the importance of a strong introduction in our papers, expliciting what our research confirms or questions in the existing knowledge and what new knowledge it adds. There is no question to be able to do that without conducting beforehand a sound analysis of the literature. H Maisonneuve in his blog gave an interesting link to the Lancet’s definition of what a good introduction should look like in a medical research paper:

This Is What a Strong Introduction paragraph Looks Like:

introduction

 

writing a journal article? start with the So What question

6 Jan

patter

I’m running another writing course soon in Iceland and have been sorting through potential pre-reading material. In my file of pdfs I came across an editorial written by Neil Selwyn in the journal Learning, Media and Technology. The piece is called ‘So What?’… a question every journal article needs to answer‘.

It’s pretty apparent that Selwyn was tired of getting papers that weren’t suitable for his journal. In his three years as Editor he’d obviously seen a lot of unsuitable submissions – and he really, really didn’t want to see any more. You can hear his frustration in his very clear delineation of what is and isn’t acceptable for his journal….

These ‘proof of concept’ and ‘best practice’ studies of the application of specific digital devices and practices in particular educational settings are clearly necessary and worthwhile stages in the development of any educational technology. Yet work of…

View original post 369 more words

We need to talk about titles

19 Aug

The Research Whisperer

Jonathan LaskovskyJonathan Laskovsky is the Senior Coordinator, Research Partnerships in the College of Design and Social Context at RMIT University. He is primarily responsible for managing research partnerships support and administration within the College.

Alongside this role, Jonathan has research interests in modern and postmodern literature with a particular focus on fictional space and critical theory.

He tweets infrequently as @JLaskovsky and can be found on Linkedin.


A colon The dreaded colon

We need to talk about titles. We’ve been neglecting them and it’s starting to show.

Neglect signifies that we once cared for titles but, for some reason, the care has ceased or become sporadic at best (insert your favourite garden-tending metaphor here).

This neglect might partly be explained by the ever-increasing pressure on academic life: large teaching loads, increasing demands for research output, conferences, meetings and other administrative distractions, as well as our paltry attempts to maintain some kind of work-life balance…

View original post 900 more words

Pitfalls of retrospective database studies

30 Mar

As you know a part of my work consists to participate in studies based on the extraction from retrospective databases and the analysis of the informations thus retrieved. The eligibility of the beneficiaries to the provision that represents the study’s outcome is always a major concern. There is two explanations for a beneficiary not having access to a care according to the data retrieved from the reimbursement base: either a real lack of access or a non eligibility of the care for a record in the reimbursement data base (for example if the insured is covered by another insurance or has lost his coverage and has exited from the health plan)*. I have always to keep in mind that I work on secondary data which are only a reflection of the primary data the reality of which I try to apprehend.
The dilemma is pretty well addressed in this article:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1524-4733.2003.00242.x/full

*as always there is a third possibility: the data concerning the care has been erased from or not yet recorded in the base. The timeline of the refreshment of the base (ie the loading and the purifying of the data) must be precisely described in the methodology of the study.

Article cited:
1)- Motheral, B., Brooks, J., Clark, M. A., Crown, W. H., Davey, P., Hutchins, D., Martin, B. C. and Stang, P. (2003),

A Checklist for Retrospective Database Studies—Report of the ISPOR Task Force on Retrospective Databases.

Value in Health, 6: 90–97. doi: 10.1046/j.1524-4733.2003.00242.x

Two other articles address the pitfalls of inferring from secondary data extracted from a retrospective data base:

2)- Berger M, Mamdani M, Atkins D, Johnson M.

Good Research Practices for Comparative Effectiveness Research: Defining, Reporting and Interpreting Nonrandomized Studies of Treatment Effects Using Secondary Data Sources: The ISPOR Good Research Practices for Retrospective Database Analysis Task Force Report—Part I.

Value in Health 2009 ; 12(8) :1044-52
3)-

The use of claims databases for outcomes research : Rationale, challenges, and strategies. Annual international meeting of the Association for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA), 1996/05/12. CLINICAL THERAPEUTICS, vol. 19, n° 2, 1997, pages 346-366, 74 réf., ISSN 0149-2918, USA. MOTHERAL (B.R.) *, FAIRMAN (K.A.). Outcomes Research. Express Scripts. Inc. Maryland Heights. USA

Full text of the article here:

http://ehealthecon.hsinetwork.com/Motheral_ClinTher_1997.pdf

 

The French national medical Board incites physicians to produce content on the internet

16 Mar

The French national Medical Board declares in its last Newsletters that Physicians, as a reliable source of information, should be encouraged to produce contents on the Internet. The ethic is the same as in a patient-physician relationship but the advantage is that the patient can takes his time to apprehend and deepen the information given to him by the physician by consulting his website. The National Board incites physicians to be present on the Web as professionals. But Doctors can also have their blogs like every citizen, provided that they do not discredit the profession and its digital reputation. And provided also that they do not use their blog for advertising and for falsely flattering their skill! The Board recommends also the Doctors to stay sober in their presentation and not to request fees in their websites, but I think that that went without saying.

http://www.conseil-national.medecin.fr/sites/default/files/livre_blancdeontoweb2012.pdf

http://www.conseil-national.medecin.fr/sites/default/files/charte_internet_cnom2014.pdf

http://www.conseil-national.medecin.fr/newsletter/2014/3

How to write a good (bad) title ( abstract)

20 Feb

Here below is a link toward an interesting post on the qualities that a title should have (in fact half of the post gives the recipe of an empty uninformative, useless title, in an ironic way, with the intend to be more pedagogic).
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/02/05/academics-choose-useless-titles/

And the same author in another post, with the same sharp irony shows us how to write a bad abstract :

View story at Medium.com

By the way the title of my post is not informative enough according to the standards here above. At least a cue of what the response to the question is should have been inserted.

Flawed evidence based medicine

26 Jan

James Coynes is a professor of psychology who has dedicated an important part of his research field in denouncing the flawed evidence based medicine applied to the psychology practice. His writings in PLOs blog are an example of the critical appraisal we all should exercercise when we read such advertisements as “evidence supported”.
Here bellows is a link toward his posts in PLOs blogs:
http://blogs.plos.org/mindthebrain/author/jcyone/

%d bloggers like this: